Technicolour Treasure Hunt: Learn to Count with Nature by Nan Na Hvass and Sofie Hannibal

A beautiffuly designed board book

Learn to count from one to ten with this nature-inspired treasure hunt, which contains 80 first words to see and say. Turn the tabs of the chunky board book to discover all the colours of the rainbow. Visual learning made fun.

Published by Wide Eyed.

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One Lonely Fish by Andy Mansfield and Thomas Flintham

Counting books, like alphabet books, invite creativity. There are some alright ones, some banal ones and then, there are some brilliant ones. This one falls into that last category. One lonely fish, sounds like the beginning of a sad story with a predictably happy ending. Nope, sorry fish… page by page a bigger fish gets chomped by an even bigger fish, until all nine are consumed by number 10 (a big, BIG fish).

The triangle mouth shapes of the pages are fun to turn over as you sound out the gruesome chomp. My toddlers love this book and I love reading it to them.

Highly recommended by Mr Magpie

Published by Templar Publishing.

Little Houses: A Counting Book By Helen Musselwhite

Little Houses is a magnificent book, the artist Helen Musselwhite has illustrated the book with paper to create model houses in a variety of settings. Everything is handmade, by cutting individual pieces of coloured and painted paper.

Apart from being a slap-up meal for your eyeballs, the book has another purpose, it is a counting book, (that’s right mums and dads, it’s not for you – hands off).

Children can use this charming book to help them to learn to count from 1 – 10, in addition to this they will learn about different types of houses from different parts of the world – from a Scottish crofter’s cottage to ten town houses beside a canal in Amsterdam.

Published by Laurence King.

Have You Seen My Monster? By Steve Light

Have You Seen my Monster?

The follow up to Have you seen my Dragon? In the first book, you search for the dragon, hidden amongst the cityscape. It’s a superb finding book; however – the book is essentially a counting book. Check out my review.

In Steve Light’s new book, we search for a monster as he enjoys himself at the fairground. Only this time, we are not learning to count, we are learning the names of 2D shapes. What a fantastic way to learn all those tricky names – squares, triangles, trapezoids, ellipses, kites and more.

Steve Light has blended classic concept book themes, to create fun, educational and original children’s books. His black and white, pen and ink illustrations with splashes of vivid colour are beautiful to look at and full of energy.

I’m already looking forward to the next book in the series.

Have you seen my magpie? That would be cool.

Published by Walker Books

Here are 10 magpies Steve drew for me some time ago.

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The Learning Garden: Counting by Aino-Maija Metsola

Often with picture books & concept books I find my words are unnecessary, the illustrations and the design of the book tell the viewer everything they need to know.

This one for example… there is nothing much to comment on, apart from perhaps – Look! Isn’t it beautiful!

I’ve said it many times on here, Wide Eyed Editions are publishing beautifully designed, non-fiction books for children – they are one to keep an eye on (a wide eye).

Tactile gifts for toddlers that make learning fun, created by leading Finnish artist Aino-Maija Metsola.

Journey from numbers one to ten, and see and say objects along the way. Count the animals and lift the flaps to discover a host of surprises on every page.

Bold, eye-catching artwork and sturdy card lift-flaps make this a favorite with children and adults alike.

Wide Eyed Editions

Ten Little Dinosaurs by Mike Brownlow, Illustrated by Simon Rickerty

A stomping, chomping dinosaur romp from the creators of the multi-award-winning, bestselling Ten Little Pirates.

Orchard Books

Published May 7th 2015

This book is fantastic fun, a counting book with rhyming text, BIG, BOLD illustrations and hilariously horrific hiccups that result in the apparent demise of one more little dinosaur on every page.