The Sandwich Thief By Andre Marois and Patrick Doyan

Marin loves the sandwiches his parents make for him-every day they’re different and more delicious than the last. One morning, someone dares to steal his favourite sandwich: ham-cheddar-kale. Furious, Marin begins a fevered and famished investigation to unmask the thief. The days go by, the suspects multiply and Marin’s sandwiches continue to disappear. This droll, graphic caper is a funny school mystery exploring the high stakes of low blood sugar.

The first in a series, the book’s witty text and graphic illustrations make this funny school mystery perfect for early and advanced readers alike-and for anyone who’s been the victim of lunchtime crime.

Published by Chronicle Books.

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Aama: You Will be Glorious, My Daughter Volume 4 by Frederik Peeters

On Ona(ji), Verloc Nim is the sole survivor of an expedition to recover Aama, the experiment that has transformed the surface of this desert planet into a landscape inhabited by lethal biorobotic creatures and plants. Having pieced together the events of his recent past – his journey to Ona(ji), his part in the deadly expedition to Aama’s source – Verloc finds himself physically transformed by his confrontation with the experiment. But will his extraordinary new powers be enough for him to save his daughter? The final volume of Aama, You Will Be Glorious, My Daughter, is the culmination of Frederik Peeters’> award-winning series – a gripping blend of breathless action, existentialism and suspense, and a spectacular vision of the distant future.

Published by SelfMadeHero

750 Years in Paris By Vincent Mahé

In this graphic novel, Vincent Mahé creates a historical timeline like no other. 750 years of Parisian history, visualised with the aid of a single building. Starting in the 13th Century and ending in the present day. With each turn of the page we see how historical turmoil and triumphs have shaped the city.

A brilliant idea, expertly executed.

Published by Nobrow.

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki

A 2015 Caldecott Honor Book
A 2015 Michael L. Printz Honor Book

This One Summer is a tremendously exciting new teen graphic novel from two creators with true literary clout. Cousins Mariko and Jillian Tamaki, the team behind Skim, have collaborated on this gorgeous, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful story about a girl on the cusp of childhood – a story of renewal and revelation.

– Published by First Second Books

Mouse Bird Snake Wolf by David Almond, illustrated by Dave McKean

The gods have created a world – they’ve built mountains, a sea and a sky – and now their days are filled with long naps in the clouds (and tea and cake). That’s until Harry, Sue and little Ben begin to fill the gaps of the world: with a mousy thing, a chirpy thing and a twisty legless thing. As the children’s ideas take shape, the power of their visions proves to be greater than they, or the gods, could ever have imagined.

– Walker Books

HARVEY by Herve Bouchard, Illustrated by Janice Nadeau, Translated by Helen Mixter

First ever winner of the Governor General’s Award for both text and illustration

Harvey and his little brother are playing in the slushy streets of early spring when they learn, out of the blue, that their father has died of a heart attack. Everything changes and Harvey’s favorite movie, The Incredible Shrinking Man, suddenly begins to dominate his fantasy life. When relatives try to get him to look at his father in his coffin, Harvey finds himself disappearing.

Brilliantly illustrated, emotionally true and devastatingly sad, this book is a very artful and yet utterly convincing look at the experience of extreme emotional trauma.

Published by Groundwood Books

ELCAF 4th East London Comic & Arts Festival

This weekend – Saturday 20th June – Sunday 21st June

Founded in 2012, ELCAF’s aim is to introduce and celebrate both small press publications and the dynamic community of individual artists and collectives that are pushing the boundaries in comics, illustration, graphic and sequential art here in the UK and abroad. Each year ELCAF has seen an incredible growth; larger venues, more exhibitors, and a greater number of people coming through the doors.

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Q & A with Joe Sparrow

Q1: How did you get the Nobrow 17 x 23 gig?

It was pretty sudden – I was tabling at ELCAF 2013 and I ended up
chatting a bit to Alex Spiro, one of the two guys that founded the
company. Then a few months later I got an email pretty much out of the
blue from Alex talking about how they wanted to do some more books in
the 17×23 series and asking me to pitch a few story ideas. Prior to this
I’d been selling my own self-published stuff at conventions for a couple
of years beforehand, so I already had a few finished stories under my
belt. Also, if I was ever at a convention where nobrow had a stand I’d
make a point of going over and saying hi! I have no idea if that
actually contributed to them wanting to collaborate with me though.

Q2: Which comics from the 17 x 23 series do you own?

Do you have a favourite?

I owned a few of the original bunch and I’ve been buying all the new
ones as they come out. It’s really cool to see the diversity of styles,
both in the art and the narrative! I’d really struggle to pick an
absolute favourite… I dig Jen Lee’s stuff a lot; I really admire her
use of colour in particular. Plus as an animator I can really see that
capability in her drawings – I mean it’s always amazing to see her
characters in motion, but even in her static work I like the way she
constructs them out of these really simple, readable shapes but they
still have tons of character. I’d love to be able to draw like that.

Q3: I love the pixelated artwork in your comic The Hunter

– why did you choose this approach?

I started getting into pixelart a few years ago during a period
where I was really frustrated with my art in general and I wanted to get
back into a way of working that I actually enjoyed. Working at a
pixel-level is very satisfying for me because it’s pretty much the
highest degree of control you can have over a 2d image that’s on a
screen, and I like having a lot of control over the way stuff looks.
There’s also something really paradoxical about seeing it in print, but I
quite like that. Sometimes people mistake it for a printing error, which
is understandable!

I decided to use the pixelart method for The Hunter partially because I
wanted it to be a fun thing to work on, something I’d enjoy. It also
struck a weird, videogamey chord with the story – it made me think of
games like Pokemon or Monster Hunter where some players obsessively task
themselves with “100% completion” – meticulously achieving every goal
possible, often investing hundreds of hours. It felt like the story was
about a similar kind of obsession, like this guy equates the goal of
living a fulfilled life with completing a bunch of videogame quests.

If anyone’s interested, style-wise my two main influences with the
pixelart are Paul Robertson and the anonymous Japanese game dev who
calls himself “Pixel” (maker of the game Cave Story, which I’d highly
recommend).

Q4: I stumbled across your blog Dungeons and Drawings,

can you tell us about it and how it came about?

I played D&D (Dungeons & Dragons) with some friends once or twice
when I was a kid – it’s a real eye-opener of a game, like you just start
playing it and you realise you can do pretty much whatever you want. It
really blew my mind at the time! I picked it up again with some friends
at uni, getting into it on a more creative level, writing stories,
designing characters etc. When we finished uni in 2010, Blanca
(Martinez, my girlfriend & the blog’s co-creator) and I started coming
up with ideas for personal art projects that we could work on (since we
were finding it hard to find freelance work at the time and we wanted
something to do). We’re both super into RPGs (she even more so than I)
and we came up with the idea to start this art blog where we post our
own redesigns of classic fantasy RPG monsters. I think she came up with
the name and it stuck! The inspiration came from our memories of looking
at the Monster Manual as kids, and the fun of endlessly leafing through,
comparing power levels and picking favourites. We published a book last
year and our currently working on a follow-up, so hopefully people can
get the same sort of satisfaction from our stuff!

Q5: Which illustrators inspire you?

Quite a few at the moment. At random: Rebecca Sugar, Jonathan Djob
Nkondo, Thomas Wellmann, Matthieu Cousin, Valentin Seiche, Masaaki
Yuasa, Boulet, Jillian Tamaki, Josceline Fenton, Ben Sears, Kim Sloane,
Jack Cunningham.

Q6: What’s next for Joe Sparrow?

Right now I’m actually directing an animated short, a little cartoon
bio of Mozart, that should be out later this year. It’s been a lot of
fun to research, and music is probably a pretty close second to art in
my life in terms of interests so I’m really looking forward to seeing
what I can do. After that I want to get back to comics and do something
a little larger-scale. I’d like to write a story that’s more about the
characters than anything else (I feel like a lot of my stories are just
“stuff happening”, there isn’t much of a character element to them).
Anyway, lots of plans!

Art Schooled by Jamie Coe

I spent 4 years at Art School – the characters in this graphic novel certainly reflect the kind of people and experiences I remember.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

”Daniel Stope is a small-town guy who dreams of becoming an artist. His enrolment at art school and consequent move to the city opens up a world of exciting possibilities. Unsurprisingly, Daniel struggles with his newfound independence – the difficulties of dating and making new friends in the big smoke. This new graphic novel by the exciting young illustrator Jamie Coe is a visually powerful tale. Coe’s penchant for films and visual story-telling manifests itself in his expert ability to craft beautifully structured and atmospheric illustrations.”

– www.jamiecoe.com

Published by Nobrow